Reasons To Watch The McCloskey Case

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Fact sheet:

1. Both Mark and his wife Patricia are personal injury trial lawyers.

2. Their home is on a private gate no trespassing street.

3. The couple was featured in St. Louis Magazine for their impressive renovation of the famous estate in 1988. Now more than 30 years after purchasing the home, which was once owned by Edward and Anna Busch Faust — the son of a revered St. Louis restaurateur and daughter of the beer-making Busch family — they have restored the Renaissance palazzo back to its original glory.

Mark McCloskey told the magazine, “All the plumbing was made by Mott, which was the premier manufacturer at the turn of the century, and all the door and window hardware was made by P.E. Guerin.” Patricia McCloskey noted “the glass in the windows” was from the second-floor reception hall at the 14th century Palazzo Davanzati in Florence, “and the shutters, at least the ironwork, are probably original.” The property is appraised at $1.15 million, according to St. Louis city property records.

4. McCloskey is representing a victim of police brutality in a lawsuit against a Missouri police department and officer. According to the Associated Press, David Maas, a Woodson Terrace Police officer at the time, was caught on dashcam video appearing to assault a man and was indicted on a federal charge in March.

5. While some on social media have claimed the McCloskeys are registered Democrats, it was not immediately possible to determine whether the couple are actually registered as Democrats or if they are registered Republicans. But Federal Election Commission records show Mark McCloskey has contributed thousands of dollars to the Trump Make America Great Again Committee, the Republican National Committee, and Donald J. Trump for President Inc. He also made contributions to a Republican congressional candidate, Bill Phelps, in 1996, and to the Bush-Quayle campaign in 1992.

Patricia McCloskey also made a contribution to the RNC in 2018 and to a Republican Senate dinner in 1988.

Attributions in part

6. Missouri Castle Doctrine in part:

Justified Use of Force  Physical force:May be used when individuals reasonably believe that the physical force used is necessary for the defense of themselves (or others) from an imminent attack of unlawful force from another person.May be used when individuals believe that the force is reasonably necessary to prevent another person from stealing, causing property damage, or tampering.Deadly force:May be used when a person reasonably believes that the level of force is necessary for self-defense or defense of others (including unborn children) in response to an imminent threat.
No Duty to RetreatA person has no duty to retreat:From their dwelling, residence, or vehicleFrom their private propertyIf the person is any other location where they have the right to be

7. Mr. McCloskey said he started trying to arrange private security for the house when the couple received a tip saying the protesters were planning to come back to ‘get us and burn the house’. ‘We had been told that the city police had been ordered to stand down, we had been told there was going to be no official help,’ he said. ‘Our neighborhood association put out a flyer saying if people broke in they were just going to let them. ‘So we started trying to hire private security and entity after entity said they did not want to get involved.’ The situation became so bad that the couple started ‘hiding’ their valuables and were told by one security firm of former special forces members to ‘walk away’ and ‘abandon’ the house.

8. The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department confirmed that it executed a search warrant on the McCloskeys’ house on Friday. The department said the search was authorized by a judge, but would not comment on any other aspect of the investigation.

“Our Department executed a search warrant, which was issued by the Courts,” a department spokeswoman told the Free Beacon. “Since the investigation is ongoing, we have no further comment to provide.”

The rifle held by Mark McCloskey during the altercation was seized by police during the search, according to KSDK. The handgun held by Patricia McCloskey was turned over to police by the couple’s former attorney Albert Watkins, who told the St. Louis American the gun was inoperable at the time of the incident.

9. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Tuesday that President Trump would be “getting involved” in the case of the St. Louis couple who pointed guns at a group of protesters passing outside their home last month, and who are under review for criminal charges.

On Tuesday, both the president and Republican governor offered separate impassioned defenses of Mark and Patricia McCloskey, who went viral after brandishing guns at protesters on the private street outside their mansion on June 28.

Parson, who said the couple had “every right to protect their property,” said he spoke with Trump just before the governor’s coronavirus news briefing. He said Trump made it clear he “doesn’t like what he sees and the way these people are being treated,” referencing the McCloskeys.

He said Attorney General William P. Barr “was represented on the call,” and he thinks the president and the attorney general “are going to take a look” at the McCloskeys’ case.

10. Kim Gardner, the prosecutor targeting the McClosky’s has a very dark resume herself. In 2019, Gardner admitted to repeat campaign finance violations dating back to her time as a Missouri State Legislator. These violations included using campaign donations to pay for a private apartment. Gardner reached an agreement with the Missouri Ethics Commission to pay a settlement of $6,314 in lieu of a $63,009 fine.  The Circuit Attorney’s Office has experienced a more than 100% turnover rate in staff since Gardner took office. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported in September 2019 that “over 65 attorneys with a combined experience of over 460 years in prosecutorial experience” have left the Circuit Attorney’s office under Gardner. On June 3, 2020, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that the Circuit Attorney’s office had released all of the 36 rioters who had been arrested. This drew criticism from the Gardner’s longtime public opponent Eric Schmitt, the Attorney General of Missouri. Gardner’s office responded that the individuals were released due to insufficient evidence.

11. The Safety & Justice Committee, a George Soros PAC was a large donor to Gardner. St. Louis Today reported in June of 2016 in part: Gardner’s campaign reported to the Missouri Ethics Commission a $24,548.37 in-kind donation from the same federal campaign committee, a day after reporting a $25,738.86 contribution from that super PAC. Then on July 29, Gardner reported an additional $72,770.27 from Safety & Justice, bringing the Soros-backed super PAC total contribution to Gardner’s campaign to at least $190,750.73.

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