A Terrorist Donated $3.3M to the BLM War Chest

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Her name is Susan Rosenberg and President Clinton commuted her prison sentence. Just as bad, Congressman, Jerry Nadler (D-NY) was a good friend of Rosenberg and worked diligently to get her released from prison. Rosenberg was part of the May 19th Communist Organization and proud of the bombings.

M19CO), was a US-based revolutionary organization formed by members of the Weather Underground Organization. The group was originally known as the New York chapter of the Prairie Fire Organizing Committee.

Rudy Giuliani and Andy McCarthy prosecuted her.

Now we need to continue to ask where is Obama’s old friend Bill Ayers. Why you ask?

Hold on tight, here we go.

Susan Rosenberg is a convicted domestic terrorist and radical left activist whose youth was spent protesting the Vietnam War and racism in America. A member of the Weather Underground and other radical organizations which used violence as a tool for political change, Rosenberg was sentenced to 58 years in federal prison after being arrested for possession of explosives and weapons during the planning of a number of bombing operations. [1] She was also a suspect in a 1981 armored car robbery which left one guard and two officers dead. She was released in 2001 when then-President Bill Clinton commuted her sentence. [2]

The commutation led to bipartisan criticism from Republican New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) as well as police officials. [3] Rosenberg continued her radical activism through the publication of her 2011 book, An American Radical, and as the Vice-Chair of the fiscal sponsor group Thousand Currents. [4] [5] She also spent 12 years working for the left-of-center social activism group American Jewish World Service and co-founded the anti-prison group National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls. [6]

From 2016 to 2020, Thousand Currents became one of America’s most influential racial and social change organizations because it is Black Lives Matter Global Network’s fiscal sponsor. [7] As the group’s fiscal sponsor, Thousand Currents handles Black Lives Matter’s administrative and back-end work so the racial group can focus on its activism, protests, and riots. [8] As of June 24, 2020, Thousand Currents had deleted from its website the Board of Directors information listing Rosenberg’s biography. [9]
Early Life

In an excerpt from her 2011 book, An American Radical, Rosenberg describes being raised by civil rights advocates. Her father ran a dental practice which focused on helping “Spanish Harlem” residents, and her mother helped struggling artists get on their feet. Both of her parents opposed America’s Cold War-era nuclear build-up, the Vietnam War, and racial inequality in the mid-20th century. [10]

As a child, Rosenberg participated in anti-war demonstrations in New York and, at 15 years old, went to Washington, D.C. with her school to oppose the Vietnam War. She describes seeing police strike and arrest protesters who “raised a North Vietnamese flag on the Justice Department building,” and release tear gas. After the protest, she joined her school’s anti-war group and helped organize activism against the war. [11] Rosenberg’s description of the protest does not include mention of the rioting and property damage caused by activists who put the flag on the Department of Justice roof. This damage was cited by Dr. Wayne Thompson in his 2000 book, To Hanoi and Back, which is included in a number of official federal agencies’ historical records. [12]

Rosenberg’s high school group was part of the national Students for a Democratic Society. The group splintered due to factional interests, and at least one faction’s leadership led to the creation of the terrorist group Weather Underground. [13]

After college, Rosenberg worked as an anti-drug counselor and continued to be involved in anti-war and anti-racism movements. [14]
Political Activism & Terrorism

Rosenberg joined the Weather Underground and other radical, radical left groups which used bombings and other terrorist attacks to protest the Vietnam War and police brutality against minorities. The Underground was founded to overthrow the U.S. government through violent means, though its attacks on police and military resulted in no known deaths. [15]

She also helped found the John Brown Anti-Klan Committee, a radical group which looked to anti-slavery revolutionary John Brown for inspiration to oppose the Klu Klux Klan in the late 1970s and early 1980s. [16] [17] The Committee and Klu Klux Klan members took their conflicting activism to extreme levels, including violence against each other’s membership. [18] [19]

Rosenberg’s terrorism reached a peak when she and other radicals led the May 19th Communist Organization (M19CO). The nation’s only female-led Communist terror group, it helped break a convicted cop killer out of prison in 1979 and organized a number of bombings around the country. The group also participated in a Rockland County, New York, armored car robbery which left a guard and two police officers dead. Rosenberg’s 1984 arrest was one of several arrests over a six-month period which led to the Organization’s collapse. [20]
Brink’s Robbery

On October 20, 1981, Rosenberg’s May 19th Communist Organization and members of the Black Liberation Army carried out a robbery attack against a Brink’s armored car in Nanuet, New York. [21] According to CIA documents, this criminal coalition, known as “The Family,” was organized by Mutulu Shakur, stepfather of the late hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur. [22]

While Rosenberg maintained her innocence in the Brink’s robbery, a report by the New York State Criminal Justice Institute placed Rosenberg at the Mount Vernon safe-house that served as a staging location for the assault. [23] The $1.6 million stolen in the raid was intended to be used to fund the “New Afrika Movement.” [24]
Conviction and Parole Request

Rosenberg managed to evade arrest for three years following the Brink’s robbery. During this time, MC19CO orchestrated a series of bombings against federal government targets, including a blast detonated outside the Senate Chamber of the United States Capitol Building. [25]

Law enforcement caught up to her in November 1984 after she used stolen identification to rent a storage unit to stash away guns and bomb-making materials. The suspicious facility manager called police who noticed Rosenberg was wearing a disguise as she and an accomplice were unloading the supplies. They were both arrested and investigators found more than 700 pounds of explosives, along with multiple firearms and thousands of false ID cards.

Rosenberg was convicted on federal explosives and firearms charges and sentenced to 58 years in prison, the longest conviction for such charges in American history. [26] [27]

Future New York City mayor and President Donald Trump personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, at the time a U.S. District Attorney, led Rosenberg’s prosecution. Though she was indicted for planning and driving in the Rockland County case, Giuliani declined to purse prosecution because of the long sentence Rosenberg received on the other charges. [28] [29] Former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy, who convinced a federal judge to oppose Rosenberg’s request for parole in 1999, wrote that Giuliani also didn’t want to put the public and robbery victims through a second trial. [30]

Rosenberg’s attorneys sought parole on the basis that Rosenberg had been a model prisoner and had rejected her previous terrorist activities and beliefs. [31] They also argued that her sentence was extreme compared to the charges upon which she was convicted, and that McCarthy’s use of the robbery to argue against parole was invalid because Giuliani had dismissed the charges. [32] McCarthy maintained that it was Rosenberg’s radical declarations during her trial and her regret that “she hadn’t had the courage to shoot it out with police” when she was arrested that led to the lengthy sentence. He also argued that the robbery rightly played a role in the parole rejection because “it has long been the law that sentencing courts and the Parole Commission may take into account any conduct, even if the defendant has been acquitted — which Rosenberg, of course, had not been.” [33]
Commutation

See also: “Other Controversies” section of the Bill Clinton profile.

After Rosenberg’s parole request was denied, President Bill Clinton commuted her sentence on his last day in office. She was one of 176 people protected by Clinton that day, including indicted fugitive March Rich and former Clinton Whitewater associate Susan McDougal. McDougal was convicted of bank fraud in the Clinton Whitewater scandal investigation. [34] Clinton also commuted the 40-year sentence of Rosenberg co-conspirator Linda Sue Evans. [35] Evans was imprisoned for 11 counts of false identification used to purchase firearms and for harboring a fugitive related to the armored car murders. [36] She was also convicted in 1990 for participating in a number of terrorist bombings, including at the U.S. Capitol Building. [37]

Rosenberg’s commutation brought bipartisan condemnation from Giuliani, Schumer, and at least two police officials. Officials cited by The New York Times at the time of the commutation included then-New York City police commissioner Bernard Kerik, who had escorted Rosenberg to and from her trial, and Rockland County union police official David Trois. Trois said he believed Rosenberg participated in the armored car robbery, a claim she denied. [38] Kerik said the commutation “sickened” him. [39]

The New York Times published an editorial criticizing Clinton’s pardons on his last day in office, including the ones for Rosenberg and Evans. [40]

In an interview three days after her “executive clemency,” Rosenberg said in an interview with leftist political group Democracy Now that “the whole issue with my case was a question of due process…” She called Clinton’s action “an important statement…” Her attorney said that Rosenberg desired to go to trial over the armored car robbery to prove innocence, but Giuliani and his office declined to do so. “…[T]heir evidence was flimsy at best,” said the attorney. [41]

During a 2008 Democratic presidential primary debate, then-candidate Barack Obama criticized President Clinton’s decision to grant Rosenberg clemency. [42]
Commutation Actors

Rosenberg’s commutation included a number of key players, such as:

Jerrold Nadler

In 1993, at the request of her mother and rabbi, Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D—NY) reached out to the Bureau of Prisons on Rosenberg’s behalf for permission to visit her dying father. [43] Nadler continued to advocate for Rosenberg leveraging his connections within the Clinton White House. [44]

Nadler also signed a letter in 2019 asking the New York State Board of Parole to release Judith Clark, another member of MC19CO convicted for her role as the getaway driver in the Brink’s robbery. [45]

In 2011, Nadler told the far-left anti-war publication TruthOut that he criticized “the head of the Bureau of Prisons,” who opposed letting Rosenberg visit her father for security reasons. According to Nadler, he was told that Rosenberg was “still in contact with some of her terrorist friends from the outside” and that the Bureau of Prisons was concerned that her armed entourage would be targeted by those associates. Nadler said his first response to the concern was, “So?” Later, he said he pressured the Bureau into keeping the visit secret and still provide armed security, as had been done when transferring Rosenberg to several prisons. [46]

Howard Gutman

Attorney Howard Gutman of the prestigious Williams & Connelly law firm represented Rosenberg in her efforts to gain executive clemency. The Williams & Connelly firm also led President Bill Clinton’s impeachment defense. [47] Gutman, who later raised $500,000 for President Barack Obama’s White House campaign, became the United States Ambassador to Belgium in 2009. [48] [49]

60 Minutes Producers

Rosenberg was interviewed by “60 Minutes” in 2000, where she claimed to be “really afraid” of “the government” after the Brink’s robbery. While she maintained her innocence in that crime during the interview, she also portrayed herself as distrusting the government instead of engaging in terrorist bombings with M19C0. [50] While there is no direct causational relationship between the interview and the commutation, they took place within three months of each other. [51]
Post-Commutation

Left-of-center groups like the PEN American Center have praised Rosenberg for her HIV/Aids advocacy while in prison. [52]

Immediately following her release, Rosenberg became the Communications Director at the left-of-center American Jewish World Service organization, a position she held for nearly 12 years. [53] [54] AJWS is an advocacy, grant, and issue-oriented organization which promotes both human rights like freedom from sex slavery as well as left-of-center social change priorities like greater access to abortion and advocacy for transgenderism. [55]

Rosenberg co-founded the anti-prison group National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls. [56] The organization advocates for fewer women and girls in prison and for a change in America’s prison system from punishment to criminal reform efforts. [57]

Rosenberg has taught as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York and Hunter College. [58] In 2004, she was offered a teaching position at Hamilton College that was pulled after protests by faculty and students. [59] Rosenberg has widely lectured on prominent college campuses about her prison experience and her political views. [60]
Thousand Currents

Formerly known as the International Development Exchange (IDEX), Thousand Currents is a left-of-center grantmaking organization. [61] As of June 16, 2020, Rosenberg sat on the Thousand Currents Board of Directors serving as Vice Chair. However, the organization subsequently deleted the Board of Directors information listing Rosenberg’s biography from its website. [62]

While still known as IDEX in 2016, Thousand Currents began a sponsorship of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. [63] In 2019, financial documents showed the group held over $3.3 million in assets earmarked for BLM. [64] As of June 24, 2020, access to financial information had been deleted from the organization’s website. [65] [66]

With assistance from Thousand Currents, the Black Lives Matter Global Foundation established a $12 million fund in the months following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police. [67] Thousand Currents claims support for BLM’s mission “to eradicate White supremacy and build power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes through its educational and charitable activities.” [68]

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