Glorifying ‘rampant’ child rape in Afghanistan and Napier’s lesson

Via Vice News Screenshot Youtube
Via Vice News Screenshot Youtube

“Western forces fighting in southern Afghanistan had a problem. Too often, soldiers on patrol passed an older man walking hand-in-hand with a pretty young boy.”Joel Brinkley of San Francisco Gate, 2010

“‘Stop imposing your values on others,’ was the message for the American soldiers…. I found it heartwarming.” – “cultural anthropologist” Richard A. Shweder in an OpEd for the New York Times, 2007

“The reason we were here is because we heard the terrible things the Taliban were doing to people, how they were taking away human rights…But we were putting people into power who would do things that were worse than the Taliban did — that was something village elders voiced to me.” – Dan Quinn, a former Special Forces captain who beat up an American-backed militia commander for keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave.

“As a culture that has repeatedly allowed the victimisation of young men by their elders, and turned survivors into abusers, Afghanistan has unleashed multiple generations of predators and traumatised young men.” Christian Steven of RYOT, January, 2015

“If my commanders don’t f*** these boys, who will they f***? Their own grandmothers?'” Afghan Police Chief – Vice News, 2013

Earlier this month, the New York Times reported on “rampant” child rape in Afghanistan. The “tradition” is so prevalent among “allied” police commanders in Afghanistan that it has a name:  “bacha bazi.”

The scolding tone of the New York Times article seems disingenuous, as the once-venerable news source also published an OpEd in 2007 by “cultural anthropologist” Richard A. Shweder “critical of the military for not being more culturally relativist,” as pointed out by Mollie Hemingway of the Federalist.

Speaking of Montgomery McFate, “who has taken her Yale doctorate into active duty…to convince skeptical colleagues that the occupying forces should know more about the local cultural scene,” Shweder wrote:

“Ms. McFate stressed her success at getting American soldiers to stop making moral judgments about a local Afghan cultural practice in which older men go off with younger boys on ‘love Thursdays’ and do some ‘hanky-panky.’ ‘Stop imposing your values on others,’ was the message for the American soldiers. She was way beyond ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’ and I found it heartwarming.”

Heartwarming.

The author, at this point, would be remiss not to address the mortifying and moronic practice of sending “cultural specialists to unfamiliar warzones” which started under the Bush Administration. Wired reported in 2012 that the little-known $100 million-per-year program has been “wracked by allegations of mismanagement and the unfortunate deaths of three of its social scientists…

Latino studies specialist Anna Maria Cardinalli was part of a Human Terrain Terrain in Afghanistan. Photo: U.S. Army
Latino studies specialist Anna Maria Cardinalli was part of a Human Terrain Terrain in Afghanistan. Photo: U.S. Army

What an embarrassment.

The way Afghan pedophilia is portrayed and seemingly glorified by the radical left is perhaps a signal as to why the White House has brushed it aside.

As reported at the Washington Examiner, Pentagon spokesman Capt. Jeff Davis said:

“What’s talked about in this, while abhorrent, is fundamentally an Afghan law enforcement matter and those are reports that are given to the Afghan government.”

The sickening response is a cop-out considering that Afghan law enforcement is heavily engaged in the child rape, as clearly described at Vice News and Frontline.

Speaking of glorifying child rape, consider an article at the Dartmouth about a 2013 panel discussion with the “artists in residence” who were “working on ‘Bacha Bazi [Boy Play]’ with the New York Theatre Workshop.”

The author, Heather Szilagyi, writes:

Dynamics of sexuality, gender and heteronormativity are important topics explored in the play. While not representative of all dancing boys, the main character, Hafiz, is gay and finds dancing to be empowering.

Panel discussion with "artists in residence” who were “working on ‘Bacha Bazi [Boy Play]’ via thedartmouth.org
Panel discussion with “artists in residence” who were “working on ‘Bacha Bazi [Boy Play]’ via thedartmouth.org
As pointed out at Human Events by Michelle Malkin, any ignorance of this brutal and demeaning “custom” would have been impossible after Afghan journalist Najibullah Quraishi’s wrenching documentary on “The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan,” which “aired in London and the U.S. in 2010.”

Additionally, Frontline covered the practice in 2010 in such a way that leaves no doubt that this practice takes place with regularity among some of the powerful men in Afghanistan.

Click here to watch the documentary.

Malkin chides:

…the United Nations has known and done nothing as Taliban warlords and Afghan police groomed, sodomized and sexually trafficked generations of young boys.

According to the recent NYT article, American soldiers who may have stood against this outrage “…have been instructed not to intervene — in some cases, not even when their Afghan allies have abused boys on military bases, according to interviews and court records.”

Excerpt:

In his last phone call home, Lance Cpl. Gregory Buckley Jr. told his father what was troubling him: From his bunk in southern Afghanistan, he could hear Afghan police officers sexually abusing boys they had brought to the base.

“At night we can hear them screaming, but we’re not allowed to do anything about it,” the Marine’s father, Gregory Buckley Sr., recalled his son telling him before he was shot to death at the base in 2012. He urged his son to tell his superiors.

“My son said that his officers told him to look the other way because it’s their culture.” [emphasis added]

In May of 2013, Vice News discussed the hideous practice:

Worst of all, police commanders were routinely abducting young men and using them as ‘chai boys,’ house servants who were also kept as sex slaves. In separate incidents, three of those boys had been shot dead while trying to escape. One was shot in the face and one was shot at police headquarters…The police chief first said that the boys had chosen to live on the patrol bases: ‘They like being there and giving their asses at night.’ He also claimed that the practice of soldiers sexually abusing them was necessary. ‘If my commanders don’t f*** these boys, who will they f***? Their own grandmothers?’

Watch here (start at 2:22):

Napier’s lesson

With this in mind, consider Charles James Napier, Commander-in-Chief of British forces in India in the 1840’s.  Hindu priests complained about the prohibition of suttee (also known as Sati), the custom of burning widows alive on the funeral pyre of their husbands, by British authorities.

According to Napier’s brother William, this is how he replied:

“Be it so. This burning of widows is your custom; prepare the funeral pile. But my nation has also a custom. When men burn women alive we hang them, and confiscate all their property. My carpenters shall therefore erect gibbets on which to hang all concerned when the widow is consumed. Let us all act according to national customs.”

Do we want to be the type of people who stand by and allow children to be raped (or body parts of dead children to be sold for profit)?

Or, do we want to follow in the footsteps of Commander Charles James Napier and stand against clear atrocities?

This author chooses the latter.

Cross posted at Broadside News.

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Author: renee nal

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2 thoughts on “Glorifying ‘rampant’ child rape in Afghanistan and Napier’s lesson

  1. A long while ago, I predicted the left’s moves…

    1.) Infiltrate the Catholic church with gay pedophile predators.
    2.) Pretend to be horrified at the scandal of pedophile priests.
    3.) Use that scandal to weaken the church, even destroy it.
    4.) Slowly, incrementally, march pedophilia towards acceptance.
    5.) Rewrite history: claim that the pedophile priests were “persecuted heroes.”

    This “laboratory” of Afghanistan is a perfect example of the march toward acceptance. By viewing child rape as “a different culture,” they can do their favorite conversational stunt: “Y’know, there are many cultures around the world where that’s not only accepted, but celebrated!” (How many times did we have to hear that French people accept infidelity, which makes them “far more sophisticated” than “uptight Americans”? Well, now we have that infidelity the left dreamed of. Yay for us.)

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