NoKo-a-NoGo

NoisyRoom
By: Terresa Monroe-Hamilton

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North Korean and South Korean guards face each other in the Demilitarized Zone, 2011. Photo: Michael Jesus Day/Flickr

America is on the brink of World War III, but seems to be more concerned with Beyonce and her Cuban exploits (she’s a Marxist elitistist – what do you expect?), than impending nuclear annihilation. Bread and Circuses for all! Oooh! Look, shiny…

Over the years, North Korea, since the last conflict with South Korea, has blustered and threatened on a continual basis. It has been a ploy to get money and support out of the U.S. and the U.N. and has worked time and again. This time is different. Kim Jong Il, who masterfully played the U.S. for time, money and food, is now dead. His son, Kim Jong Un now rules with an iron fist and has ratcheted up the rhetoric and threats. So much so, that I don’t see him backing down without at least attacking South Korea. He can’t afford to lose face. North Korea is capable of attacking our troops stationed over in South Korea and firing nuclear missiles at the U.S. And he has threatened just that. To openly threaten a country with a nuclear attack, in my book, is an act of war. But here we sit, listening to the crickets, biding our time and the North Koreans aren’t exactly shaking in their jackboots.

North Korea’s Army is currently the fifth largest in the world. Let that sink in. Here are the top 10 currently:

1. United States
2. China
3. Russia
4. India
5. North Korea
6. Turkey
7. France
8. Iran
9. Pakistan
10. United Kingdom

I would argue that China has a larger force than we do, but I’ll let that slide for now. The Korean People’s Army includes five branches of service: ground force, navy, air force, special operations and strategic missile force. Its military is huge with over one million on active duty. Combined with their staggering reserve force of over eight million, it has the largest military in the world. So, when the NoKo turkeys make nuclear threats, show a little respect. They just might mean it. They truly hate America and blame her for all their ills. And although South Korea is our ally, we are widely hated there as well by many of the people we are protecting. Sounds a lot like the Middle East.

When all of this started to blow up, Hagel got on the phone with China to beg them to get North Korea to back off. What an idiot. That’s like going to Hitler to ask for the Muslims to back off. North Korea is a proxy state for China. Nothing happens there without their tacit consent. All the theater of evacuating embassies in North Korea and the Chinese refusing to go, is just that… theater. The Chinese are in control. As an added bonus, I suspect Iran is paying the NoKos to stir up crap so they can finish their nuclear development and Russia is in the mix too. Things are not as they appear. We are being set up for a worldwide conflict that will crash all economies and reset the geo-political playing field, including the U.S. You are watching it playing out right in front of your eyes — at least you’ll be watching it till the EMPs fly.

While the NoKos have moved two long range missiles to their coast and loaded them on their launchpads, we blinked this morning. The U.S. is now delaying a test of our Minuteman III Intercontinental Missile out of California to ‘ease’ tensions with North Korea. Fools. This won’t ease tensions, it will embolden North Korea, because in the end, even if they attack the South, they believe we won’t do squat. It shows the U.S. is weak and in disarray. They believe at most we’ll throw sanctions at them and wag our finger in disapproval. That’s a recipe for nuclear war and global chaos.

The NoKos are prepping a missile test or some other provocative act and soon. They have threatened to launch a nuclear war next Wednesday. Who knows? No one seems to believe the North Korean kid who cried wolf – they are staying put in their embassies and are saying things are calm, but tense. But remember, the wolf eventually showed up.

We have deployed a spy plane to Japan for surveillance. The Global Hawk will be stationed at the U.S. airbase in Misawa, northern Japan, in the first ever deployment of the aircraft in the country. We have sent nuclear capable B-2 and B-52 bombers and stealth F-22 fighters as well. In addition, the U.S. said last week that two of the Navy’s missile-defense ships were moved closer to the Korean Peninsula and a land-based missile-defense system is being deployed to the Pacific territory of Guam. But before you applaud all this, this firepower, from what I understand, is parked. More military propaganda and not a real deterrent. From Zero Hedge, more muscle is secretly being moved to the area:

First the US fanfared the placement of two F-22 Raptors in the Osan airbase of South Korea. Then it demonstratively launched a B-2 stealth bomber on a training mission over a South Korean gunnery range. Then it deployed an anti-ballistic missile defense system to Guam and positioned two guided-missile destroyers in the waters near Korea. And now, courtesy of the Aviationist, we learn that the Pentagon has escalated once more in an ongoing cat and mouse game with North Korea, of who blinks first, and dispatched several B-1 (“Bone”) Lancer strategic long-range bombers to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. What is different this time, however, is that unlike the previous very public and widely trumpeted reciprocal escalation steps, this particular deployment has been kept secret from the public (at least the broader public), “a fact that could be the sign that the U.S. is not only making symbolic moves (as the above mentioned ones), but it is preparing for the worst scenario: an attack on North Korea.”

One would hope so, but I would not hold my breath. Although, the following is interesting:

Finally, and most disturbing, is that another aircraft also in the process of deployment is none other than the E-6 Mercury “Doomsday” plane, which are among the pinnacle in US Airforce nuclear war preparedness, tasked with “providing command and control of U.S. nuclear forces should ground-based control become inoperable” and whose core functions include conveying instructions from the National Command Authority to fleet ballistic missile submarines and also to further command post capabilities and control of land-based missiles and nuclear-armed bombers.

Obama has spent all of his time in office ignoring North Korea. Now they speak of placing anti-missile interceptors on both coasts, but it will take years to make them functional. We don’t have years. North Korea has the capability of striking the U.S. with nukes used as EMPs and as weapons of death and destruction. WND:

WASHINGTON – As the North Korean government cautions staffers at British and other Western diplomatic missions that it can’t guarantee their safety after “April 10,” the North Korean General Staff is warning the United States again that it had “better ponder over the prevailing grave situation.”

The statement threatened to unleash “cutting-edge smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear strike means” against what the North Koreans believe are U.S. preparations to wage a nuclear war against them.

“The merciless operation of its revolutionary armed forces in this regard has been finally examined and ratified,” the General Staff statement said, indicating that in addition to the threat of a missile attack, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or DPRK, may deploy its million-man army.

Cliff Kincaid at America’s Survival has this to say:

Red China is preparing for war, backing a North Korean strike on South Korea and the U.S.

A left-winger by the name of Hyun Lee says, “What has gone underreported in U.S. media is China’s readiness posture. China has placed its military on high alert in the event of an outbreak of war on the Korean peninsula. In a move reminiscent of its entry into the Korean War, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army has increased troop presence, tanks, armored personnel carriers, and air patrols along its border with North Korea. In a show of support for North Korea, China has been holding live-firing naval exercises in the West Sea, a site of recurring tensions between the two Koreas.”

This leftist thinks the U.S has been provocative, but the truth is that Communists are Communists. And under Obama we are unprepared for war. Could Obama be setting South Korea up for obliteration from a nuclear attack from the North? And what if North Korea does have a nuclear weapon that can hit the U.S.?

Whether all this is bluster or not, can we take that chance? We shouldn’t. It’s time for preemptive action to protect the U.S.’ interests and citizens. Damn it, act like a real super power and believe insane dictators when they threaten nuclear war! Right now, we’re dancing the NoKo-a-NoGo. Let’s just hope that soon we aren’t dancing under the light of a nuclear blast.

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7 thoughts on “NoKo-a-NoGo

  1. The NOKOs don’t have to hit us directly. Take out Seoul and hit Japan and the economy collapses. We have no money. Obama has our troops scattered across Africa and the Middle East where they’ll be unable to withdraw from with any kind of speed. One would almost think that the commander in chief is a traitor setting us up for destruction.

    1. Groman, Like Steve Pieczenik said on his website who is in Korea at the moment, this is what he said “A couple things worth mentioning, I have been denied help or access to U.S. Embassy, U.S. Military Base, KCIA etc. Considering that I was a former deputy assistant sec of state for E Asia….you would think they would want some free help but nope! Seems these inexperienced politicos are trying to separate off from the more experienced, knowledgeable state department, korea experts but why????
      Also this is him reporting live from Korea!

  2. OK, I’m going to take this on because there are considerable errors in this.

    – To say the US is “widely hated” in south Korea is a bit of an exaggeration. It has been an open vibrant liberal democracy for the last 25 years and no major Presidential candidate has campaigned for US base withdrawal. It simply isn’t on the agenda. Even those with softer stances towards the DPRK (which means more dialogue basically) oppose removing the US military presence until there is a peace treaty and verification of DPRK demilitarisation. Just because a few student and leftist groups protest US bases in the ROK (which have scaled down considerably since the end of the Cold War) doesn’t mean it is mainstream.

    – The Chinese are NOT in control, this is blatant nonsense. China has been trying to push the DPRK into economic reforms, into reducing expenditure on its military and to normalise relations with the ROK, Japan and the US for over 20 years now, and to no avail. China’s primary interest is stability and it wants access to the ample mineral reserves in the DPRK, but it isn’t getting either in any great quantities, because the Koreans are extremely suspicious and distrusting of the Chinese for historical reasons. There is far more openness to Russia and western European countries (and indeed Australia and New Zealand) than to China, for fear of being swallowed up. The DPRK has plenty of positive relationships with African states and does not want to follow them in being a vassal of China. China voted for the UNSC sanctions because it is fed up with the DPRK, it wants to convince the DPRK that it can have its cake and eat it by maintaining an authoritarian system and have enterprise zones to be an economic success. Iran buys arms from the DPRK, but it is suspected that Iran is unwilling to pay the price the DPRK would ask to sell it the technology, and China is thoroughly opposed to the DPRK selling nuclear technology to Iran.

    – Kim Jong Un’s “iron fist” rule is overplayed, in fact there is plenty of evidence that the military is really in charge, especially outside Pyongyang. The Party is increasingly just a shell, because money talks, and those able to earn hard currency from trading can buy their way anywhere in the country. He is a useful figurehead, and the Kim family and their associates are highly dependent on maintaining favour with the military, but it would be a mistake to think he has firm control beyond that. The state was groomed for 20 years for his father to take over, but he had 2.

    What this looks more and more about (from those who actually understand Korean, rather than speculators who are outside all this) is an internal battle within the DPRK for control, and an attempt to get aid. Kim Jong Un purged the party and military, in typical Stalinist style, shortly after taking power. He now has to prove to the military that he is willing to do what it takes to be a true patriot (having had no military credentials himself, but then neither did his father although there were manufactured ones from a past few could question).

    The appropriate response is simple, and should parallel what the Clinton Administration said in the mid-late 1990s. If the DPRK uses WMDs, then it will be an act of suicide for the country will cease to exist not long afterwards. Make it clear that the response will be total.

    The DPRK has changed, a lot, in the past ten or so years. South Korean DVDs circulate freely in the country, mobile phones abound amongst the military and party elite, and the border regions with China also abound with black market mobile phones using Chinese networks, which frustrates the regime. Moreover, effective control of the country has increasingly shifted from party and state officials, to military officers who are black-marketeers buying and selling goods and services with hard currency. The party and military are increasingly less concerned about this, as long as there is stability and no effective opposition, and as long as Pyongyang keeps getting food and power, and has no protests.

    Bear in mind also that there remain serious shortages of food and oil, which are fairly essential for waging war for any sustainable period.

    The other parallel strategy should be clear, keep flooding the place with leaflets and battery powered radios, so that news of the outside world keeps getting in.

    1. Terresa Monroe-Hamilton was right on target when she said “North Korea is a proxy state for China.” And South Korea is a major manufacturing competitor of China which gives China a profitable incentive to eliminate them using North Korea as their weapon of choice. I was surprised at how much is manufactured in South Korea when I read the list here: http://www.productfrom.com/country/KR/

      And lets not forget that Japan is another manufacturing competitor of China. So money and power being the primary sources of evil – China may think this as a win-win situation,

      On a lesser note, I think the only thing Barry Obama is worried about is causing a major flub that would force the Nobel Prize Committee to confiscate his Peace Prize. And, as always, hindsight has 20-20 vision, and Gen. Douglas MacArthur was right. We should have dropped the Atomic Bomb on North Korea to finish off the war but it took a Democrat named Harry Truman to relieve him of his command.

  3. …. when the NoKos turkey gobbles, show a little respect. He may just believe himself and/or mean what he gobbles.

    Or perhaps he’s engaging in the annual lets pretend to piss off America charade, so the Fascist Media and other “Democrats” will see to it America will continue to feed us and to deliver aid and food and fuel and stuff.

    For remarkably little kickback for the Kennedy Crime family and others similar, too.

    Start believing it’s real when the wives and children of America’s Military Forces are evacuated.

    …. South Korea is our “ally,” we are widely hated there as well by many of the people we are protecting ….

    We are hated everywhere and by at least eighty per cent of the population of the western “civilized” world and by a way higher percentage of the barbarians – the chinese and indians and arabs, eg.

    Morbid Envy and/or Pathological Hesperophobia will do that to yah. Has that effect.

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